Over the past few weeks a number of local newspapers have featured articles about me and ****, or, The Anatomy of Melancholy, which has been absolutely great. I’ve clipped and attempted to scan (you’ll notice the quality is a bit rubbish!) a few of the pieces to share with you all. Each article has been transcribed below, but you can also click on the images to read the original articles too.

* * *

Author Matthew Selwyn featured in a local newspaper article

Click on image to zoom

First novel about life in digital age

| by Guy Martin |

BOOKS could be perceived as the antidote to the instant gratification of the digital age, so it is perhaps appropriate that a Royal Holloway librarian has chosen to write a novel dealing with what he calls ‘one of the internet’s children’.

Parents, web-addicted youngsters and anyone who has spent many an hour in front of a computer screen may identify with the book, entitle ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy, and publishers Electric Reads certainly did, upon agreeing to publish the book.

It is the work of student and librarian Matthew Selwyn.

Mr Selwyn, who lives in London, gained an online following with his book review blog Bibliofreak.net, which has become one of the most popular in the country.

But he has also become aware of a less positive impact of the internet, inspiring him to write his first novel.

The experience of seeing other affects by mental health problems also inspired the work, and depression and loneliness are explored in the book.

But Mr Selwyn insists it is not all doom and gloom and promises readers the book is engaging, funny and touches upon issues which society will have to address as the ‘millenial [sic] generation’ grows up.

“I’m really interested in the internet and how it affects us as human beings,” he said. “I think it’s a really important issue. We now have a generation of young people who have grown up with it.

“The internet is fantastic but, like everything, it has the potential not to be.”

The book’s main character’s mind is described as being formed by material coughed up by the web, and his story is told from his own warped perspective.

Mr Selwyn studies and is a librarian at Royal Holloway University of London, and he has been writing around various work commitments, courses and visits to public libraries, which he is a great advocate of.

He has started work on a second novel, about an agoraphobic and repressed homosexual going to see the work of Salvador Dali in Spain.

His first book has already led online reviewers, including on the website Amazon, to describe his writing in glowing terms, with the novel currently rating at 4.9 out of five in a reader poll on the site.

The book is available on the site and from major retailers.

Newspaper article about ****, or, The Anatomy of Melancholy

Click on image to zoom

* * *

Newspaper notice about The Anatomy of Melancholy by Matthew Selwyn

Click on image to zoom

Author’s insight into internet effect

BOOKS could be perceived as the antidote to the instant gratification of the digital age, so it is perhaps appropriate that a local man has chosen to write a novel dealing with what he calls “one of the internet’s children”.

Parents, web-addicted youngsters and anyone who has spent many an hour in front of a computer screen might identify with the book, entitled ****: The Anatomy of Melancholy, and Electric Reads certainly did on agreeing to publish the book.

It is the work of student and librarian Matthew Selwyn.

Matthew, who lives in London, gained an online following with his blog reviewing books, Bibliofreak.net, which has become one of the most popular in the country.

But he has also become aware of a less positive impact of the internet, inspiring him to write his novel.

Experience of seeing other people affected by mental health problems also inspired the work, and depression and loneliness are other themes in the book.

But Matthew insists that it is not all doom and gloom, promising readers it is engaging, funny and touches upon issues which society will have to start addressing as an age group he refers to as the ‘millennial generation’ grows up.

“I’m really interested in the internet and how it affects us as human beings,” he said. “I think it’s a really important issue. We now have a generation of young people who have grown up with it.

“The internet is fantastic but, like everything, it has the potential not to be.”

Matthew studies and works as a librarian at Royal Holloway University of London, and he has been doing his writing around his work commitments, courses and visits to public libraries.